QRSI 2017 Instructor Bios

Arthur P. Bochner

Arthur P. Bochner is distinguished university professor of communication at the University of South Florida and a distinguished scholar of the National Communication Association. He has established an international and interdisciplinary reputation for his theoretical, critical, and empirical contributions to the study of narrative and autoethnographic inquiry including narrative identity, narrative truth, illness narratives, and memory work.

An originator and developer of reflexive social science methodologies that bring emotions, subjectivity, and storytelling into research in the social sciences, his highly influential monographs and books have introduced new concepts such as institutional (organizational) depression, vulnerable medicine, relational dialectics, and genre bending forms of representing lived experiences that have helped shape the work of three generations of communication researchers. Currently, he teaches the only course with love in its title offered at the University of South Florida.

Dr. Bochner has published more than 100 monographs, articles, and book chapters as well as three books, two edited volumes and four special issues of academic journals. Co-editor of three book series, he has presented keynote lectures and workshops across the globe.His 2014 book, Coming to Narrative: A Personal History of Paradigm Change in the Human Sciences, received the best book award from The International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry and the Ethnography Division of the National Communication Association. Among his other numerous awards are the Charles H. Woolbert Research Award from NCA’s Ethnography Division, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Center for Qualitative Inquiry, Ohio University’s Elizabeth Andersch Award for career contributions, and two NCA awards, Bernard J. Brommel Award for distinguished contributions to family communication and the Samuel L. Becker Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Bochner’s most recent book is Evocative Autoethnography: Writing Lives and Telling Stories (Routledge, 2016) with Carolyn Ellis.

Carolyn Ellis

Carolyn Ellis is distinguished university professor of communication and sociology at the University of South Florida (USF). She has established an international reputation for her contributions to the narrative study of human life. Having published extensively in qualitative methods, storytelling, emotions, and loss and trauma, she integrates ethnographic, literary, and evocative writing in short stories, research articles, and documentaries to portray and make sense of lived experience in cultural context. She is best known as an originator and developer of autoethnography, a reflexive approach to research, writing, and storytelling that connects the autobiographical and personal to the cultural, social, and political. Seeking to do research that has the possibility of improving human lives and enhancing social justice, she currently is engaged with Holocaust survivors in collaborative and compassionate interviews guided by a relational ethics of care.

Dr. Ellis has published five monographs, six edited books, and more than 150 articles, chapters, and review essays. She has edited two book series and presented keynote addresses and workshops in sixteen countries. Her most recent book is Evocative Autoethnography: Writing Lives and Telling Stories (with Arthur Bochner). Her numerous national and international lifetime career, scholarly, mentoring and book and article awards include the Charles H. Woolbert Research Award and the Distinguished Scholar Award, both from the National Communication Association (NCA), The Legacy Lifetime Award and best book and article awards from NCA’s Ethnography Division, a Lifetime Achievement Award in Qualitative Inquiry and a best book award from the International Center for Qualitative Inquiry at the University of Illinois, and numerous research, teaching, and leadership awards from USF.

Alison Hamilton

Alison B. Hamilton, Ph.D., M.P.H., a Research Anthropologist in the UCLA Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, received her Ph.D. in medical and psychological anthropology from UCLA in 2002, and her M.P.H. in Community Health Sciences from UCLA in 2009.

Dr. Hamilton is the Director of the VA-funded EMPOWER (Enhancing Mental and Physical Health of Women through Engagement and Retention) Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI), focused on improving women Veterans’ health and health care through implementation science. She is Associate Director for Implementation Science and Director of the Qualitative Methods Group at the VA Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation and Policy, specializing in women Veterans’ health, mental health services research, and implementation science. She was a fellow in the inaugural cohort of the NIMH/VA Implementation Research Institute and she serves on the editorial boards of Implementation Science and Women’s Health Issues. She currently leads two HSR&D-funded women’s health studies, including a four-year mixed methods study of women Veterans’ attrition from VA healthcare use and a multisite study of improving multilevel stakeholder engagement in women’s health services research.

Dr. Hamilton has been a consultant with ResearchTalk for over 18 years, providing direct support to clients as well as serving as faculty for several of the Qualitative Research Summer Intensives and mentor at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Data Analysis Camps. At recent Intensives, she taught courses on qualitative methods in implementation research, rapid qualitative research methods, qualitative grant-writing, qualitative interviewing, mixed methods research, and enhancing the usefulness of qualitative research. Dr. Hamilton is a co-author on Dr. Ray Maietta’s Sort and Sift, Think and Shift forthcoming publication.

Sherick Hughes
Sherick Hughes is an Associate Professor of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As the Founder/Director of the Interpretive Research Suite and Bruce A. Carter Qualitative Lab, and Founder/Co-Director of the Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Studies, his equity work focuses on: (a) Critical Race Studies & Black Education, (b) Social Context of Education and (c) Qualitative/Mixed Methodology in Education. Hughes has numerous peer-reviewed publications, including two books selected for AESA Critics’ Choice awards (2007, 2014). He is the lead author of the new Sage textbook, Autoethnography: Process, Product & Possibility, and the 2016 recipient of an AERA Distinguished Scholar Award. Currently, he serves as a member of the AESA Executive Council.

George Kamberelis

George Kamberelis is an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He conducts research and scholarship on qualitative research methods and literacy learning and teaching in school and non-school settings. He is especially interested in the philosophical and theoretical foundations of qualitative inquiry and the quasi-unique affordances of focus groups in qualitative research studies. His theoretical and empirical work has appeared in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, Research in the Teaching of English, Journal of Literacy Research, Linguistics and Education, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, and Qualitative Inquiry. Citations for publications especially relevant to the course he is teaching at the Qualitative Research Summer Institute are listed below:

Kamberelis, G., Dimitriadis, G., & Welker, A. (In press).Focus group research and/in figured worlds. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative research (5th ed., pp. xxx-xxx). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2014). Focus groups: Retrospect and prospect. In The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research Methods (pp. 315-340). New York: Oxford University Press.

Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2013). Focus groups: From structured interviews to collective conversations. New York: Routledge.

Martin, A. D., & Kamberelis, G. (2013). Mapping not tracing: Qualitative educational research with political teeth. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 26(6), 668-679.

Kamberelis, G.(2013). Focus group research. In M. Savin-Baden & C. Major (Eds.).An Introduction to qualitative research (pp. 386-387). New York: Routledge.

Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2011). Focus groups: Contingent articulations of pedagogy, politics, and inquiry. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative research (4th ed., pp. 545-561). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2005). Focus groups: Strategic articulations of pedagogy, politics, and research practice. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative research (3rd ed., pp. 887-907). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Kamberelis, G., & Dimitriadis, G. (2005). On qualitative inquiry: Approaches to language and literacy research. New York: Teachers College Press.

Kamberelis, G. (2003). Ingestion, elimination, sex, and song: Trickster as premodern avatar of postmodern research practice. Qualitative Inquiry, 9(5), 673-704.

Ray Maietta
Raymond C. MaiettaPh.D. is president of ResearchTalk Inc., a qualitative research consulting company based in Long Island, New York and Cary, North Carolina. A Ph.D. sociologist from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, with postdoctoral training at Indiana University, Ray’s interests in the art of qualitative research methods motivated him to start ResearchTalk in 1996. ResearchTalk Inc. provides project consultation and co-analysis services on all phases of qualitative analysis to university, government, not-for-profit, and corporate researchers.

More than 20 years of consultation with qualitative researchers informs Dr. Maietta’s publications and a current methods book he is writing:

  • “Systematic Procedures of Inquiry and Computer Data Analysis Software for Qualitative Research,” co-authored with John Creswell, in Handbook of Research Design and Social Measurement (Sage Publications, 2002)
  • “State of the Art: Integrating Software with Qualitative Analysis” in Applying Qualitative and Mixed Methods in Aging and Public Health Research, edited by Leslie Curry, Renee Shield, and Terrie Wetle (American Public Health Association and the Gerontological Society of America, 2006).
  • “The Use of Photography As a Qualitative Research Method” in Visualizing Social Science, edited by Judith Tanur (Social Science Research Council, 2008).
  • “Qualitative Software” in the Sage Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods, edited by Lisa Given (Sage Publications, 2008).
  • “Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis with MAXQDA” in Journal of Mixed Methods (Sage Publications, April 2008)
  • “The Symbolic Value and Limitations of Racial Concordance in Minority Research Engagement”, co-authored with Craig S. Fryer, Susan R. Passmore, et al., in Qualitative Health Research, March 13, 2015 (Sage Publications)
  • Sort and Sift, Think and Shift, (Guilford Press) in progress.

Ray’s work invites interactions with researchers from a range of disciplinary backgrounds. He is an active participant at conferences around the country including invited presentations at American Evaluation Association, American Anthropological Association, and American Sociological Association.

Paul Mihas

Paul Mihas is a senior social research associate specializing in qualitative research at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In this role, he regularly advises graduate students and faculty on qualitative methods, software, and strategies for analysis. He is the former managing editor of Social Forces, a journal of sociology published at the University of North Carolina Press. As a qualitative analysis consultant with ResearchTalk (since 2001), Mihas has lectured on qualitative methods and strategies for analysis at several universities, including the University of Puerto Rico, Howard University, and Temple University. He has also served as faculty at the annual Qualitative Research Summer Intensive and a mentor at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Data Analysis Camps. His interests include memo writing as a stand-alone method; his current research focuses on cancer survivors and metaphors for illness and the body. Mihas received an M.A. (1989) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mihas is a co-author on Dr. Ray Maietta’s Sort and Sift, Think and Shift forthcoming publication.

Johnny Saldaña

Johnny Saldaña is Professor Emeritus from Arizona State University’s (ASU) School of Film, Dance, and Theatre in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. He is the author of Longitudinal Qualitative Research: Analyzing Change through Time (AltaMira Press), The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers (3rd ed., Sage Publications), Fundamentals of Qualitative Research (Oxford University Press), Ethnotheatre: Research from Page to Stage (Left Coast Press), Thinking Qualitatively: Methods of Mind (Sage Publications), co-author with the late Matthew B. Miles and A. Michael Huberman for Qualitative Data Analysis: A Methods Sourcebook (3rd ed., Sage Publications), and the editor of Ethnodrama: An Anthology of Reality Theatre (AltaMira Press). His most recent book is Qualitative Research: Analyzing Life, a new methods textbook with co-author Matt Omasta (Sage Publications). Saldaña’s works have been cited and referenced in over 4,000 research studies conducted in over 120 countries, in disciplines such as K-12 and higher education, medicine and health care, technology and social media, business and economics, the fine arts, the social sciences, human development, and government and social services.

Saldaña’s research in qualitative inquiry, data analysis, and performance ethnography has received awards from the American Alliance for Theatre & Education, the National Communication Association–Ethnography Division, the American Educational Research Association’s Qualitative Research Special Interest Group, and the ASU Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. He has published a wide range of research articles in journals such as Research in Drama Education, Multicultural Perspectives, Youth Theatre Journal, Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, Teaching Theatre, Research Studies in Music Education, and Qualitative Inquiry, and has contributed several chapters to research methods handbooks.

Margarete Sandelowski

Margarete Sandelowski is Boshamer Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing. She has directed and was principal faculty in the summer programs in qualitative and mixed methods research offered through the Center for Lifelong Learning at the School of Nursing. She has published widely in refereed nursing, interdisciplinary health, and social science journals (e.g., Field Methods, Journal of Mixed Methods Research, Qualitative Health Research, Research in Nursing and Health, Social Science and Medicine) and anthologies in the domains of gender and technology, and qualitative and mixed methods research (both primary research and research synthesis). Her works have been translated into Spanish and Japanese.

Among her books are Handbook for Synthesizing Qualitative Research (Springer, 2007) and With Child in Mind: Studies of the Personal Encounter with Infertility (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993), which was awarded the 1994 Eileen Basker Memorial Prize from the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association. Among her book chapters are “Synthesizing Qualitative and Quantitative Research Findings,” by M. Sandelowski, C.I. Voils, J. Crandell, and J. Leeman in Routledge International Handbook of Qualitative Nursing Research, edited by C.T. Beck (Routledge, 2013); “On Quantitizing,” by M. Sandelowski, C.I. Voils, and G. Knafl in Sage Quantitative Research Methods: Vol.1. Fundamental Issues in Quantitative Research, edited by W.P. Vogt (Sage Publications, 2011); “Current Practices and Emerging Trends in Conducting Mixed-Methods Intervention Studies in the Health Sciences,” by M. Song, M. Sandelowski, and M.B. Happ in Sage Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research (2d ed.), edited by A. Tashakkori and C. Teddlie (Sage Publications, 2010); “Writing the Proposal for a Qualitative Research Methodology Project,” by M. Sandelowski in Qualitative Research 2 (vol. 2), edited by A. Bryman (Sage Publications, 2007); “Tables or Tableaux? Writing and Reading Mixed Methods Studies,” by M. Sandelowski in Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research, edited by A. Tashakkori and C. Teddlie (Sage Publications, 2003).

Dr. Sandelowski has been awarded as principal investigator four 5-year R01 grants from the National Institutes of Health in the qualitative and mixed methods research domains. She has served on NIH and other grant review panels, and contributed to the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research Working Group that resulted in the 2011 Best Practices for Mixed Methods Research in the Health Sciences. She was inducted in 2015 into the Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

Mario L. Small

Mario L. Small, Ph.D., is Grafstein Family Professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University.  Former Dean of the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago, Small has published numerous award-winning articles, edited volumes, and books on topics such as urban poverty, personal networks, and the relationship between qualitative and quantitative methods. His books include Villa Victoria: The Transformation of Social Capital in a Boston Barrio (2004) and Unanticipated Gains: Origins of Network Inequality in Everyday Life (2009), both of which received the C. Wright Mills Award for Best Book, among several other honors. Small is currently studying the differences in the experience of ghetto poverty across American cities and is writing a book, Someone To Talk To, on how people decide whom to turn to when seeking a confidant.

Kevin Swartout
Kevin Swartout is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology with a secondary appointment in the School Public Health at Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA. He earned his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. His research focuses on violence and aggression, specifically how it relates to social influences and substance use, as well as trajectories of violent behavior and victimization across time. He has received early-career awards from the International Society for Research on Aggression, Southeastern Psychological Association, and Georgia State University. Dr. Swartout has published several peer-reviewed research articles and frequently speaks at national and international conferences. He has been a qualitative research consultant with ResearchTalk Inc. for nine years. In this capacity, he has regularly taught short courses on qualitative and mixed methods research as well as qualitative data analysis software. Dr. Swartout frequently serves as a scholar at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Research Summer Intensive and as a mentor at ResearchTalk’s Qualitative Data Analysis Camps and he is also a co-author on Dr. Ray Maietta’s Sort and Sift, Think and Shift forthcoming publication.